Posted by: Lawyer Sanders | April 13, 2009

Kentucky environmental attorney Sanders says Invista hit with $1.7 million fine for environmental violations in seven states.

Invista will pay a $1.7 million civil penalty and spend up to an estimated $500 million to correct self-reported environmental violations discovered at facilities in seven states. The company disclosed more than 680 violations of water, air, hazardous waste, emergency planning and preparedness, and pesticide regulations to EPA after auditing 12 facilities it acquired from DuPont in 2004.

 

Invista is one of the world’s largest integrated producers of polymers and fibers, primarily for nylon, spandex and polyester applications. The company delivers exceptional value for customers through market insight, innovative products, and a powerful portfolio of some of the most recognized trademarks in industries in which it operates. As a subsidiary of privately owned Koch Industries, Inc., Invista operates in more than 20 countries across North America, South America, Europe, and the Asia-Pacific region.  Invista is a multi-national manufacturer of a wide range of polymer-based fibers, including Lycra, Stainmaster, and Coolmax.

The settlement resolves violations disclosed under Invista’s corporate audit agreement with EPA. Invista conducted 45 separate audits of environmental practices and compliance at facilities located in Seaford, Del.; Athens, Calhoun, and Dalton, Ga.; Kinston, N.C.; Camden, S.C.; Chattanooga, Tenn.; LaPorte, Orange, and Victoria, Texas; and Martinsville and Waynesboro, Va.
 
This is the largest settlement under EPA’s audit policy, which was launched in 1995. The policy provides incentives to companies that voluntarily discover, promptly disclose, and expeditiously correct environmental violations. The companies must also take steps to prevent future violations. EPA may reduce or waive penalties for certain violations if the facility meets the conditions of the policy. Consistent with the audit policy, EPA waived a large portion of the penalty in this case.

The states of Delaware and South Carolina, and the Chattanooga-Hamilton County Air Pollution Control Board in Tennessee have also joined in today’s consent decree and will share portions of the civil penalty with EPA.  The consent decree, lodged in the U.S. District Court for the District of Delaware, is subject to a 30-day public comment period and approval by the federal court.  For more information on the settlement: http://www.epa.gov/compliance/resources/cases/civil/mm/invista.html

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